Monday, March 9, 2015

Enjoy beer pong without risking pong flu

The premise of beer pong drinking game is simple. Have 10 half-filled cups of beer in a triangle, and throw ping-pong balls in them. If your opponent manages to get a ball in a cup on your side, you have to drink up the beer in it, and attempt to get a ball in one of their cups.

While a popular game in college parties, bars and clubs, beer pong carries the unnecessary risk of bacterial contamination. The students of Clemson University collected several ping pong balls used in beer pong games and tested them. They found alarming levels of many germs like Salmonella, E.Coli and Staph. [NYDailyNews.com]

These germs can cause serious illnesses in the players after the games. But there's a simple solution to mitigate the risk of germ infection altogether: Water. It's cheap, found everywhere, and can be discarded without feeling a pinch in your wallet.

Next time you play beer pong, suggest an interesting twist in the game. You can easily pitch it with the bonus point of "getting drunk twice as fast" as the traditional version. Fill up the cups half-full with water. Keep two jugs of beer and two clean empty cups - one set for each team.

Simply remove the cup of water when a ball falls in it, then pour out a *full* cup of beer into the clean cup kept with the jug and down it! You can even reset the game board and start a new game of beer pong by returning all the removed cups with the same water in them.

Remember to change the beer cup to a fresh one if the ping pong ball touches it. And don't drink any of the water. Discard the water and the cups after all games. Keep drinkable water available for players in a separate jug (but keep it out of sight so they get drunk, not sober!).

And if anyone is anal about the colorless liquid taking the fun out, just add a few drops of yellow food coloring to the water. Or better yet, use sparkling water or Sprite.

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